Tag Archives: Pencils

Way-beware

 

The chapter-by-chapter insight into Raven’s Wand continues. This week, chapter three ‘Way-beware’, and we take a look at names. . .

‘Kolfinnia’. This is a rare variant of a little-known Scandinavian girl’s name that I found in a book of baby names from a bargain bookshop. I chose it because I liked the sound of it and also because I liked the shape the word made on the page. As to its meaning, one source said it meant ‘white’, while another claimed it referred to coal and therefore black. Either way Kolfinnia has a lot of light and dark in her life.

Kolfinnia’s the glue that holds the story together and so she had to be an every(wo)man character that the reader can relate to. She’s almost eighteen and worried about her future. I remember leaving full-time education and having to find work in the ‘real world’ at last, and I think Kolfinnia faces something similar but more extreme; she isn’t job-hunting but avoiding capture and execution, but both feel just as stressful sometimes. Originally Kolfinnia was the grand, old coven matriarch (which became Valonia) and she was recounting her youth and adventures with Raven’s Wand from the vantage point of old age. . . but the split time periods (young Kolfinnia in early Victorian Britain, old Kolfinnia in the late 1800s) seemed too cumbersome and ultimately pointless. So I split the character in two, keeping Kolfinnia as the young woman we know and creating Valonia to take the role of the coven’s chief – but they began life as the same woman!

That Valonia originally came from Iceland is due to my numerous trips there, meaning I could write about the place with conviction. Valonia, by the way, is an Anglo-Saxon name meaning ‘from the valley’, and if anyone out there knows of a different meaning please keep it to yourself! I also owe thanks here to the Museum of Witchcraft and Sorcery in Holmavik, Iceland. It was in this charming museum that I learned of Iceland’s own brand of witch trials in the middle ages, and that oddly, most witches were men; there was no mention of wizards or warlocks etc, and this in turn gave me the idea to call anyone who holds faith in magic ‘a witch’, with no gender distinctions. (Check out the museum’s revolting ‘Necropants’, you won’t be disappointed).

I like to have real places in mind when I write, just to anchor them. Wildwood-coven’s Appelier Bay is based upon Morecambe Bay where Lancashire meets the Lake District, and I think Flora’s adventures on the Bay’s treacherous quicksands will have tipped off a few sharp-eyed readers. Most of the place names are made up; Chertfield, Rothwaite, Leadchester and Thornlee were all plucked from the air and if these towns do exist then I hope their inhabitants don’t mind ending up in my book by accident. Other place names are real, of course, and sprinkling the real next to the assumed helps create an air of credibility. To this end I compiled long lists of names, both personal and places, and draughted a short profile for every one of the fifty-two witches at Wildwood, whether we meet them or not, and that includes the name of their thunder-sprite, and I also drew all fifty-two of them, so I could ‘see’ who they were. Actually, I drew them twice – as my drawings went from the children’s style I’d practised previously and became more realistic, I discarded the earlier drawings and re-drew them, learning along the way. This is the depth of commitment and complexity I invested in Raven’s Wand and subsequent novels because I wanted it to be ‘right’, and I hope readers find this dedications adds to their enjoyment of the story.

Shield Maiden

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This is my most recent piece of artwork, finished only this morning and entitled ‘Shield Maiden’. It’s the summer solstice and many have gathered for the special day, but typically it’s raining! At last the clouds part and the sun breaks through, and Meredith (the girl in the picture) finally gets her chance to take part in the solstice celebrations. I love contrasts in pictures, hence Meredith’s protector is a fierce (or not so fierce) wolf. All of my work is coloured pencil and it was a challenge to draw rain, wet grass and a rainbow with such a potentially heavy medium. I dug out an old photo of mine of such a rainbow and stormy sky I’d taken years ago, and drew just what I saw. Picture’s often benefit when ‘less says more’, and I first drew the sun just showing through the clouds above Meredith’s head, and then reconsidered and removed it because her expression and eye-line do the job for us, as does the glint on the shield’s rim. Often, it’s what we don’t see that has most impact upon us.

The story of a drawing

independence

2018 sees the release of The Raven’s Wand Oracle Deck, featuring 44 pieces of my Wildwood art. I thought I’d give readers a look at what goes on behind the scenes during the creation of these works . . .

‘Can you draw me a man, but like a tiger?’ I can’t recall the exact wording but that’s how this character, Tiber, came to be. The brief was just that – brief – which suits me fine. And so I set out to draw a ‘tiger man’. At the time I was in the middle of a major commission elsewhere and had to break off for a week to complete this, which really put the pressure on. I kept looking at the clock, knowing I couldn’t afford to run over. I opted for a Siberian tiger, because I knew I wanted snow in the background, and I had great fun inventing Tiber’s little caravan. Despite all of this enjoyment, the pressure racked up. I remember it was January, and storm after storm rolled in, and the electric was on and off, and without light (and my trusty stereo) I can’t work. At one point the electric was off for 36 hours, and still the clock was ticking. I’d also just moved house, and the new place was grim and unwelcoming, and I was itching to get on with some DIY and make the place ‘mine’. So in the end, with all the odds against me, it’s something of a miracle that the image manages to capture the sense of stillness I was lacking when I drew it!

Pencils

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Coloured Pencils – handy things to know . . .

All of my Wildwood art is drawn in colour pencil, and for those with an interest in this particular medium here’s an article about getting the best from your pencils.

First I gather the reference photos I’ll need, ones I’ve taken myself or sourced from elsewhere. Then I visualise how I’ll piece them together. I always use Daler Rowney pastel paper. It has a rough side and a smooth side and I always use smooth. Most of the time I’ll use Platinum: a neutral mid-grey shade. It might sound odd drawing on grey paper but I find that drawing with colour pencil on white paper spoils the effect, as the pigment leaves all the tiny dips and depressions in the paper uncovered and you end up with a kind of ‘white noise’ behind the image that breaks up its solidity. But that’s just me – a lot of CP artists like white paper.

Graphite can dirty the colours you lay on top, but to start with I sketch up my image with a 2B pencil, and this can take up to a day as I try out different compositions. Once I’m happy I have a choice – if the colour scheme I’m aiming for is dark then I can draw on top of the graphite (with care) but if it’s bright and breezy then first I’ll ‘dab’ off the graphite drawing with a pencil rubber so that it leaves the faintest of lines. I could of course draw faintly to start with, but that’d mean using a HB or 2H and that can leave ugly scratch marks on the paper. Sometimes I draw out my composition not in graphite but with a colour pencil, that way it’s guaranteed to be absorbed by the overlaying colours. The advantage of this is that there’s no risk of graphite smudging areas of delicate detail, such as a creamy complexion on a child’s face for instance. The down side of sketching with a colour pencil first is that they don’t like being rubbed out! You’re dealing with pigment that’s got oil or wax in, and the rubber can’t always get rid of the lines as it can with graphite – so be warned. If I draw in CP first then invariably I’ll use ‘nougat’ which is a nice subtle brown shade in the Polychromos range.

So now the under-drawing’s ready and the colour work can start. I draw a lot of human characters and they can be tricky, so I always start with the face which is the hardest part. If it goes bad then I scrap the picture and haven’t lost too much time. I use a range of colours, finding they all have their strengths and weaknesses . . .

Polychromos by Faber Castelle keep their point well and have good opacity, great for fine detail.

Prismacolor (American) mix and blend better than any other brand I’ve come across. They are softer, and so not as good for crisp fine detail. Not easy to source in the UK.

Derwent Drawing pencils come in a range of 24 earth/natural colours. They are great for nature studies and their cores are quite wide so good for laying down large areas of expressive colour.

Derwent Coloursoft have a wide core and are like Prismacolor in many ways, but I find them a little ‘chalky’ and so I only have a small range, although some of them I wouldn’t do without – cloud blue and brown-black spring to mind.

Lastly on the subject of pencils, don’t forget to include a good range of grey shades. I’ll often add a hint of grey to skin tones, sandwiched in between other pigments. Relying on colours alone can give an artificial ‘Disney’ look to a scene. So don’t forget the greys. I rely on my range of French Greys a lot.

Accessories: I have a small battery powered rubber that’s very handy if you’ve got to alter a small detail in a crucial place. It’s also great drawing tool in its own right, removing colour rather than laying it down.

Pencil extenders – better than throwing 30% of your pencils in the bin! Don’t know why more people don’t use them . . .

Scalpel – always use one for sharpening pencils and for scratching the finest lines in pigment to draw hair or spider silks etc.

Fixative: I use fix not to protect the drawing, but to get rid of wax-bloom. Once your drawing’s finished you might find it looking ‘dusty’ after a few days and wonder what’s going on. It’s wax-bloom. The oils in the pencils are now seeping to the surface. It’s easy to remove, you can either just fix it to seal it and restore the drawing, or wipe it gently with a soft tissue, and then either fix it or leave it – but the wax might come back. As I tend to work heavy there’s a lot of pigment on my drawings and the bloom can be a problem, so I let them ‘rest’ a few weeks then dust them down and spray them, but never spray too much at any one time as it’ll permanently discolour the drawing!

And lastly – tea, plenty of tea . . .